Photo by Cave Canem.

The evidence is in: People don’t just want to support companies that donate to charitable causes, but to those that have sustainable, worker-friendly, community-building practices baked right into their structure and philosophy.

The idea isn’t new -- it isn’t even a “growing trend” -- it’s here now.

Evidence: Eight in 10 Millennials (81%) expect companies to make a public commitment to good corporate citizenship, according to Horizon Media’s Finger on the Pulse study. According to a Forbes article published this week about the study, they’re happy when a company gives back, but very loyal to brands like Toms and Warby Parker whose business structure (buy one, give one) is part of the business’ core philosophy.

aWe’ve been talking about “looking behind the label” for a while. We call it the Quiet Revolution, a movement led by the small, day-to-day purchasing decisions that contribute to big change. The movement is being fueled by entrepreneurs, co-ops, and non-profits across the country.

Millennials are also looking beyond initial purchase price to think about the long-term value of the products they buy. According to Intelligence Group’s Cassandra Report, 36% of Millennials usually make purchases that are only “really necessary,” and 44% prefer brands that allow them to repair, reuse, and/or recycle the goods they consume.

**If you want to find and support businesses that support your values, check out our interactive Quiet Revolutionary map and add your favorite business to the movement. **