sara.JPGFreelancers know all too well that the protections the traditional workforce enjoys – employer-sponsored health insurance, unemployment insurance, a retirement plan, and protection from unpaid wages – are out of reach for people who work outside of the cubicle. Unfortunately, the public and many policymakers are slow to catch up. That’s why I’m excited about a series of columns I’ve been asked to write for The Atlantic on “The Future of Work.” In my first column, “The Freelance Surge Is the Industrial Revolution of Our Time,” I talk about how the transition to portable, part-time, and freelance work is a shift as dramatic as what happened with the Industrial Revolution. In my second column, “A Jobs Plan for the Post-Cubicle Economy,” I sketch out the how this workforce revolution has outpaced the protections that workers depend on and argue for a “new” New Deal that would expand basic protections to the contingent workforce that now makes up 30% of American workers. I explore some of these same concepts in a guest editorial for the New York Daily News, where I also call for some specific policy fixes that will help reform and update our employment laws. The issues that I’m writing about are increasingly relevant to independent workers, government, and the public. I hope you take a minute to read through what I’ve written, and please let me know your thoughts.