New York Magazine is currently on newsstands with a cover story about New Yorkers, typically young and healthy, who work (and live) without insurance. It features a horror story about a young designer with a case of appendicitis, and profiles freelance workers taking such diverse health precautions as eating a daily kiwi and waiting for the crosswalk signal. The article points out an interesting phenomenon that we've noted before: in a guarantee-issue state, where premiums are the same no matter whether you're a healthy 25-year-old male or a 60-year-old diabetic, "adverse selection" occurs: it's the high-risk consumers who buy insurance, which makes for an ever-more expensive pool.