Digital video is a new frontier for tech freelancers

May 06, 2021

The digital boom has made demand high for tech development experts, especially those in video and image processing. More industries are turning to advanced tech solutions and content marketing that require a particular level of expertise. The pandemic has also carved out a place for freelancing video processing developers to thrive by working less and making more money doing what they love.

In a world that is turning to scientific advances in technology in nearly every industry, the role of a digital video processing (DVP) developer is becoming even more important when it comes to analyzing images and videos for research and testing purposes. Companies have developmental and functional needs and are hiring video and image processing developers to take their business to the next level and connect with their consumers in new ways.

Freelance developers are also in demand for financial reasons. Keeping developers on staff can incur employment costs like insurance and payroll taxes. Hiring a freelancer is beneficial for both freelancing DVPs and businesses in many ways. The widespread use of video conferencing has become a mainstay for communication, so finding and hiring top talent in video processing has never been easier.

Digital demand

Distancing regulations that came along with COVID-19 brought to light the need for communication solutions that don't require being face-to-face.

But the innovation doesn't stop there. Advances in video and imaging analytics have impacted navigation, security, and surveillance systems. And as the general public becomes more comfortable using technology for daily needs, smart phones, smart cars and home automation are industries that are also expecting growth.

The demand for digital innovation has made DVPs a hot commodity. Freelance DVPs are perfect for many companies that don’t have the need or ability for them to be on staff. Hiring a freelancer for a highly technical specific project as needed is more financially feasible from a business standpoint.

Other companies that do have ongoing need for video processing professionals recognize the demand and are willing to hire a freelancer because they know that they will be getting top talent.

Rise of digital video marketing

Consumers are spending more time on the internet. Video is one of the most versatile forms of content marketing, because it provides people with that face-to-face connection and requires less effort from viewers.

YouTube is the second most popular website on the internet, reaching people of all ages, all walks of life and with all sorts of interests. Other video-based apps typically reach a younger crowd, but there is evidence that people of all ages are starting to catch on.

Rise of AI

The trends in AI and image processing are leaning toward the development of automated software that can analyze images and videos. AI is now capable of completing a number of functional tasks, and industries of all kinds are benefiting from video and image processing technology.

Photo restoration, image generation and analytics are helpful not only for fixing photos, but also for analyzing and enhancing medical research. Image and video processing AI is also helping detect diseases in plants, which is a major benefit for agriculture.

Facial recognition technology is also being used in a number of ways. From unlocking devices to CCTV, AI developed for video processing can expect to become a necessity in many industries. Even cars are being developed that utilize object recognition to self-drive and indicate the presence of something that could cause safety issues for drivers.

Benefits for Developers

Startup costs

Video processing developers are turning to freelance for a variety of reasons. The No. 1 reason DVPs freelance is the cost of starting an online business.

The costs to get a website running depend on the kind of media you will be showcasing and the amount of security that you require. It can cost $1,000 on average to have multimedia such as videos added to your website, because you’ll need to use a more complicated web interface. This is why many freelance digital video processing developers use freelancing platforms. Using a freelancing platform cuts your costs dramatically and you have to do almost zero marketing for yourself.

More options

As a freelancer, you have the option to take jobs that you want or turn down jobs that don’t pay enough or aren’t very interesting to you. If you are choosing jobs that you find interest in, your productivity is likely to improve, too. There is no waiting until 5 to clock out, so you won’t be wasting time just trying to get your hours in. You work until the job is done and only when your productivity level is at its best.

COVID-era tax credits

One of the many concerns of video processing developers, and others who are entering the freelance world, is what happens if I get sick? What happens if I need to take family leave? What about a vacation? Fortunately, with the rise in freelancing and remote work opportunities, legislation is slowly coming along. In terms of COVID-19, there are provisions in place for freelancers who need to take time off to get vaccinated, quarantine and even care for others who have the disease.

Conclusion

The demand for DVP gives freelancers an edge when it comes to choosing projects and a pay scale. Remote work is becoming more common, and there are many industries that find hiring a freelancing DVP is more beneficial for their needs. The opportunities for freelance video processing developers are great and are only going to expand further as technology continues to push the limits and propel us deeper into the digital age.

This is a post from a member of the Freelancers Union community. If you’re interested in sharing your expertise, your story, or some advice you think will help a fellow freelancer out, feel free to send us your blog post.

Nahla Davies

Nahla Davies is a software developer and tech writer. Before devoting her work full time to technical writing, she served as a lead programmer at an Inc. 5,000 experiential branding organization.